Hagigit and Jerusalem’s Train Theatre Present: Purim Shpiel in the Circus

Purim Shpiel 2010 at the Train Theatre in JerusalemThe artists collective I am part of, Hagigit, has joined the Train Theatre once again to celebrate Purim. Just like our cooperation last year, we set up a photography studio and took pictures of well-costumed kids. The parents were obviously delighted since these were their kids, but I was anxiously waiting for that one photo to transcend being cute into being really interesting. This doesn’t happen often, mind you, but it did happen before. Photos captured today can be found on Hagigit’s Flickr page.

The first day already gone, you can still join us today and tomorrow in Jerusalem. Admission is 30 NIS including the play “The Cubes Circus”. More details here.

Starting tomorrow: Street theater festival in Bat Yam, and we’re in it to win it

[singlepic id=234 w=240 h=320 float=right]After months of planning and weeks of labor, Hagigit‘s latest art work will finally be revealed at the 13th annual Bat Yam International Street Theater Festival. Although the heads-up I published two months ago did not reveal much detail about the work, but I hope it generated enough interest for people to visit the festival.
If you plan on visiting, make sure you check out the program here. After you return home, you might want to check out our Facebook page for photos and videos of the event.

What: Bat Yam Street Theater Festival
Where: Boardwalk, Bat Yam, Israel
When: Tuesday to Thursday, 19:00-23:00
Who: Hagigit artist collective
Why: Because you cannot experience installation art from home
How much: Admission is free

Hagigit at the 2009 Bat Yam Fest

[singlepic id=228 w=240 h=320 float=right]Hagigit, the artists’ collective I co-founded will take part in the 13th annual Bat Yam International Street Theater Festival this coming August. We were honored to have been asked to participate, as this will be our biggest, most expensive project to date, and based on previous years we will probably see our biggest crowd ever.
I will try to reveal as much details as possible before the event, but it is a bit of a struggle as there are many people involved and not everyone shares my notion of transparency. The graphics to the right is our teaser poster that will appear in the festival program, and following is the English text that will accompany it:

Look!
 
Time is fluid, reality debatable
our point of view is not where we think it is
everything we see has changed its shape
in the gap between one moment and the next
exists an opportunity to listen, to smell,
to see and to express.
 
Hagigit’s interactive installation invites the public, yourself included, to take the whole from its parts, the revealed from the concealed, and yourself away from anyone else.
 
Location: Sela Beach parking lot, Bat Yam, Israel
Dates: August 25-27, 2009
Duration: continuously between 19:00-23:00
Admission: Free

Hagigit Interviews with Hebrew University Student Paper

The current issue of Pi’ HaAton, the weekly paper of the Hebrew University’s student union, features a two-page interview with Hagigit, the artists collective I co-founded. The article, written by Oze Rosenberg, elaborates on our vision of bringing art to the people, instead of persuading people to visit the art. This is our second interview and the first one in print media:
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Hagigit Artist Collective Launches a New Art Magazine

The artist collective I am part of has kept me pretty busy during the last couple of weeks. We cooperated with Jerusalem’s Train Theatre, donated our time for a charity in Jerusalem’s first Cooking Pot Festival, and in between managed to launch the first issue of our art magazine.
The issue, titled ‘No one will admit to it‘ is a mixture of our art works, including poems, short stories, paintings, drawings, photographs and digital art. It features a number of my photo collages and a few Hebrew poems I wrote this year.

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At this time you can purchase a copy wherever we perform, but we are working on additional ways of distribution including selected Jerusalem bookshops and making online purchasing available both for hard copies and soft copies.

Upcoming events of Hagigit are posted on its Facebook page and on its website.

Photographer Cindy Sherman’s Muse Appears in Jerusalem

After two gruelling days working an assembly line like photography studio, I have found renewed faith in the photography of children. Trying to avoid kitsch as much as possible, I worried our cooperation with Jerusalem’s Train Theatre might prove to be void of artistic merit, but boy was I wrong. Yes, many of the photos were nothing more than Jewish kids in Purim costumes smiling for mommy – but from time to time, when not pressed to fake-smile, something much deeper and profound emerged.

Following is the photo I liked most out of these two days of work. My friend Guy hinted that I might like this photo because on a subconscious level it reminds me of photographer Cindy Sherman’s work. What do you think?

[singlepic id=158 w=525 h=350 float=center]Hagigit – Purim Spiel Still #9313 – 2009

[singlepic id=162 w=525 h=418 float=center]Cindy Sherman – Untitled Film Still #21 – 1978

The Train Theatre Featuring Hagigit Present: Purim Spiel at Lilliput

It’s the Jewish holiday of Purim, and Hagigit, the artists collective I am part of, cooperated with Jerusalem’s Train Theatre for a Purim Spiel celebration for kids. The events started with a show called ‘Gulliver – The Journey to Lilliput’ by Amit Drori, based on the classic book by Jonathan Swift – and continued with us. We designed and erected a photography studio to correlate with Swift’s ideas of big and small, allowing the audience to experience being as tall as buildings or feel tinier than usual. We photographed the costumed kids and using our lean mean printing machines granted them a moment frozen in time.

Here’s a small selection of the photos taken today:

Hagigit Ends the Summer with A Blast at the Jerusalem Theatre

[singlepic id=95 w=300 h=400 float=right]Hagigit, the artists collective I co-founded, was invited to participate in the End of Summer events by the Jerusalem Theatre. We spent the last few weeks in preparation for the three day event, our biggest event to date both logistically and in terms of crowd participation. We set up our famous outdoors studio, packed it with theatre-related props, set up a work station consisting of 6 laptop computers, 2 photo printers, a wireless router, and one strategically placed electric fan.

The whole shebang worked like so: people could play dress up and don outrageous costumes, three Hagigit members staged the studio scenes and photographed them, another member was in charge of downloading the photos and distributing them using our wireless network. Most of the photos were instantly printed by another member, and a few were manipulated using Photoshop by two other Hagigit members.
Myself? I was in charge of hooking up to the jumbotron, displaying the photos taken and playing the Photoshop screen-captures, to the amusement of the crowd.

Here is a short movie consisting of photos taken at the studio:

And here is an example of the sort of Photoshop work that was done in real time, played here at 8 times the original speed:

…oh, and we got mentioned here and here.

Love In The Tub: Jerusalemite.net Discusses Hagigit


Jerusalemite.net

Hagigit, the Jerusalem artists’ cooperative I co-founded, got some attention today in the form of an interview:
Jerusalemite.net, the self-proclaimed ‘definitive English-language culture guide to the center of the world’ published today an interview with Guy Yitzhaki, a fellow co-founder of our little art group. In the interview Guy discusses the goals of our group and elaborates on our most recent activity. Check it out!

These Are Your Citizens – Tell Them Thank You for Coming to My Birthday Party

Barbecuing in a nature reserve is generally considered Israel’s national pastime, and from the look of it, the secret ingredient is placing the grill near thousands of your fellow Israelis. The more crowded the place, the tenderer the meat gets. Sacher Park in Jerusalem is just a big patch of grass within the capital city, but nevertheless thousands of Israelis choose to celebrate holidays by having a picnic there.

Hagigit  , the Jerusalem artists’ cooperative I co-founded, erected its second outdoors photo studio in Sacher Park on Israel’s 60th anniversary, for that very reason. It was an opportunity to document a cross section of the people of Israel, and we had a lot of fun doing it. Here is a sample of the photos we took. Clicking a photo will open a larger version:

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Hagigit group was founded by eight graduates of the Musrara photography school in Jerusalem. The group’s main goal is to create and encourage interdisciplinary art activities in Jerusalem, including exhibitions, street performances and cooperation with artists in different mediums and with the local community under the belief that art should not be confined to a small section of the public.